Align right

Advice from the GEA on what to look for in alignment services

Published:  26 June, 2014

Wheel alignment offers a good opportunity to make money if offered and completed correctly. There are a number of factors to bear in mind if you want to offer a professional service that will help you build a good reputation.

Firstly, the area where you carry out the alignment must be adequate for the job at hand. This means it needs to be level if you intend to offer a camber, caster and KPI angle check together with any adjustment. The reason for this is that changing the ride-height of a vehicle also changes its geometry and readings can be affected by a surface that is not level. All areas should be checked across the width and length of the vehicle area with an accuracy of 6mm over a two-metre distance. Therefore, you need to ask what service you intend to provide.

Equipment comes in all shapes and sizes. If you are only checking and adjusting toe angles then a basic manual toe gauge will suffice. If you want to provide further services then more complex equipment could be called for. There are good non-computer-based full alignment systems available so if you already have a good understanding of geometry then these will suffice, yet for full guidance a computerised system may be best. These also provide your customer with a print out, giving them a visual clue as to the work needed.

Related Articles

  • Align right 

    Wheel alignment offers a good opportunity to make money if offered and completed correctly. There are a number of factors to bear in mind if you want to offer a professional service that will help you build a good reputation.

  • Lift safely 

    The vehicle inspection lift is a key piece of equipment in the day-to-day workings of the workshop, yet it is possibly one thing that is taken for granted. Lifts have to cope with the weight of a number of vehicles, raising and lowering a number of times in a day. Therefore, it is essential that the workshop has complete trust in it, in terms of reliability and most importantly, safety.

  • It's all in the timing 

    A job I was recently asked to look at had a bit of an odd symptom; it would run (apparently quite well), as long as the camshaft position sensor was unplugged. The previous history on the vehicle, a 2009 2.5 TDI VW Transporter, was very limited. During my initial inspection, I noticed that the vehicle was suffering from a slightly extended cranking time, which is quite normal for a cam sensor related issue, as the engine ECU cannot easily calculate which TDC is which.

  • Bearing in mind 

    Wheel bearings are a component of the vehicle where friction is detrimental to their activity. The bearing must remain free and smooth in its workings in order to ensure the wheel can rotate without impediment.

  • Staying in control 

    www.blue-print.com/gscan


Search

Sign Up

For the latest news and updates from Aftermarket Magazine.


Poll

Where should the next Automechanika show be held?



Facebook


©DFA Media 1999-2018