RMI calls on government to engage with industry

Published:  20 October, 2017

Government must work to provide a stable environment for growth according to RMI chairman Peter Johnson, speaking at the RMI Annual Dinner in London last night (Thursday 19 October).

Peter said: “It is vital that the government encourages both economic and consumer confidence  and enables investment, in order for the retail motor industry to progress and thrive in a stable environment.”

He added: “The UK’s automotive sector is a global leader and the future state and success of the industry could be jeopardised if a trade deal is not secured to allow tariff free access to the European single market - following our vote to leave the EU.

“It is now essential that the government makes a commitment to outline a clear negotiating position in order to ensure our industry has what it needs to secure its future success.” Peter also announced IGA chairman Colin Parlett, owner of London-based CB Motors as the first ever recipient of the new RMI Honorary Membership Award. As well as leading the IGA, Colin has been RMI chairman on three separate occasions.

“This very special first award could not be going to a more appropriate person,” observed Peter.

Political journalist Andrew Neil was the guest speaker at this year’s dinner.

Andrew Neil

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  • The happy camper 

    It’s only when you visit the past that you realise how far the journey to the present has taken us. Some time ago Martin, a very good friend of mine from Londonderry, sent over a set of very early EVL Bosch injectors.

    This injector pattern started life around the late 1960s and ran through to the mid 1980s and was used by Ferrari, Volvo, Opel, and many others. The set supplied to me came out of a VW camper van, and like many from this era were badly rusting and contaminated from in-tank corrosion. At the time fuel lines and tanks were made from untreated mild steel, and filtration did not meet current standards of 5 microns, or 2 microns with the latest HDEV 6 injectors. The biggest single cause of wear and failure was water ingress in gasoline due to condensation and external ingress.

    The injectors were in a bad condition, sticking, blocked, and dribbling. I started the cleaning process with an external pre-clean ultrasonic tank before risking contamination in our ASNU bench. Several cleaning sessions later, with a varying degree of improvement, we arrived at a fully serviceable set.

    I posted them back assuming it would be the last of my involvement. I should have known better. Martin and Matthew at Conlon motors have been involved with our training programme over many years. I travel over there several times a year for onsite training, and you have guessed it, waiting for me on my last visit was the camper van.

    It was running extremely rich, blowing blue smoke. You could taste the emissions. If you have ever followed a vintage car you will know what I mean. This is where a trip down memory lane started.  I have not worked on this system for many years.  In fact it was on systems like this that our current-day diagnostic processes were developed.


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