“The future is electric” - IMI submits final evidence on technician licencing for Bill

Published:  20 November, 2017

The Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) has submitted its closing evidence for Parliament’s consideration regarding a Licence to Practice for vehicle technicians working on the high-voltage systems of electric and hybrid vehicles.

The IMI has published evidence that will assist the Automated and Electric Vehicle Bill Committee reach a decision on the proposed   licencing scheme.

IMI chief executive Steve Nash commented: “The IMI’s primary concern is the health and safety of the people it represents. Electricians working on domestic or commercial electrics are regulated by the Electricity at Work Act which requires them to be appropriately trained and qualified, yet there is a glaring inconsistency in allowing absolutely anybody to work on electrified vehicles which operate at potentially lethal voltages.

“The future of automotive is electric and the government are playing a very direct role in encouraging and accelerating this transition. We are just trying to ensure that the appropriate frameworks are put in place to support this.”

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