OBD provision and data access included in provisional Type-Approval legislation

Published:  04 January, 2018

The IAAF and FIGIEFA have welcomed news that crucial provisions on the OBD connector and access to RMI have been included in the proposed EU legislation on Vehicle Type-Approval regulation.

The EU Council's main preparatory body, COREPER, recognised the need for the aftermarket to maintain access to diagnostic and RMI-related data. It also clarified that access will be granted while the vehicle is in motion.

The new legislation intends to clarify that RMI and spare parts identification information shall also be provided in a machine readable and electronically processable structure. RMI information has often been made available to independent repairers in an unusable format.

FIGIEFA’s aim is that access to in-vehicle data remains possible, with the issue to be swiftly addressed in 2018 by the EU Council.

Hartmut Röhl, FIGIEFA president said: “The new vehicle type-approval and its RMI legislation, once approved, will represent a step forward and will have a positive impact for the entire automotive aftermarket and mobility services industries.

“However, the EU Commission must now find a solution on how to address the telematics access to the ‘connected car’, and we call upon it to start working in 2018 on the interoperable, standardised, secure and open-access platform.”

Significant step

Wendy Williamson, IAAF chief executive said: “This is fantastic news, and although not the end game it’s a significant step towards keeping the OBD port alive.”

While it has been clarified that the OBD port shall remain open when the vehicle is in motion, some vehicle manufacturers have introduced measures to prevent access to the OBD port.

Wendy continued: “The missing OBD connector would impact not just on garages but the entire spare parts supply chain including manufacturers, distributors, producers of diagnostic equipment and dedicated software for the OBD connector, as well as millions of consumers who would no longer have a competitive choice in vehicle servicing and repair. This positive step marks the next stage in our fight and we’ll keep lobbying until we successfully reach that end game.” 

The agreement will now need to be approved by the EP IMCO Committee before it is submitted for approval. If approved, the new regulation will come into play from 1 September 2020.

Related Articles

  • SO FAR... so good 

    You may have read about some of the challenges that the aftermarket has faced over the last year or two as part of the vehicle Type Approval revisions – with their inherent ‘rights of access to repair and maintenance information’ and the associated fight to maintain access to the vehicle data via the ever-so-not-so-humble 16 pin OBD connector.

    The draft vehicle Type Approval document has been agreed by the European Commission and the Council (Member States), but has now to be approved by the European Parliament before becoming the final version which in turn, will become new legislation. However, as many of the key aftermarket amendments were tabled by the Parliament, it seems unlikely that these will be changed, but there is always an uncertainty until the final plenary vote is done.
        
    So once agreed, that will be that, as they say. Unfortunately not, as the devil is in the detail.

    Legal reference
    Firstly, there is the additional problem of existing Block Exemption and Euro 5 Regulations which do not provide the critical legal reference to enable access to in-vehicle data beyond just emissions. The standardisation requirements are included, but not the data and information for the wider diagnostic, repair and maintenance data. This means that vehicle manufacturers can claim that access to the vehicle and the corresponding ‘wider data’ does not have to be provided. This is currently being challenged by the Aftermarket Associations in Brussels, but no solution has yet been agreed for those contentious claims and there will be many vehicles on the roads with restricted access before a workable solution can be agreed and implemented.

    As vehicle manufacturers are likely to be in contradiction with these existing Type Approval requirements, it is also likely that they will have to provide access, but this may well be through the use of electronic certificates. As each vehicle manufacturer has their own certificate strategy (process, access criteria, data available etc.), this is still a significant problem and in some cases could mean multiple certificates are needed to work on the different vehicle systems on specific models. It is also important that certificates can be used without the necessity of having to use the vehicle manufacturer’s dedicated diagnostic tool and an online connection to their server to generate the required certificate when using the 16 pin connector.

    However, the new vehicle Type Approval legislation should now provide the legal reference for the physical connector and critically, also contain a reference to the data needed for diagnostics, OBD, repair and maintenance, but beyond these important requirements there are still other elements which have yet to be discussed or agreed.

    Logical cascade     
    These other issues revolve around the secure access for independent operators, together with the exact data that will be made available once access has been granted. This may sound strange, but the 16 pin OBD port is increasingly seen as a high security risk access point into the in-vehicle networks. Consequently, some form of controlled access is highly likely to be implemented, even for such seemingly mundane tasks as checking safety system trouble codes when conducting an MOT test. This is also likely to be a ‘certificate based’ system and this introduces a whole range of new challenges!

    To understand these various issues more clearly, there is a logical cascade which starts with the legal requirement for a connector to be fitted to a vehicle. This is covered as part of vehicle Type Approval legislation, and this legislation also includes the need for the connector to be standardised from both the aspect of the physical shape and connector pin layout, but also what data or information is needed for emission systems, as well as the communication protocols that must be used. All these legislative elements have been in place for more than two decades, but the wider use of the 16 pin connector for diagnostic, repair and maintenance requirements had until the current revision of the vehicle Type Approval legislation, not been legally referenced. Now that this has (hopefully) been addressed, the next key discussions will be about who can access the vehicle via this connector, how this can be authenticated and once access is provided, what data, information and functions will be supported.

    As mentioned earlier, this is likely to require electronic certificates, but to avoid the ‘wild west’ of different processes, access conditions and data availability, a standardised process should be considered by the legislator which also uses a single and independent point of access for certificates from all vehicle manufacturers. It should also be possible to access in-vehicle data without a certificate when the vehicle is in the workshop, although software updates may require certificates. When the vehicle is being driven, ‘read-only’ data should still be available and a certificate should only be needed if some form of ‘functional’ testing is required, but this should be considered as the exception. As there is an increasing use of ‘plug-in’ devices being used to allow remote communication with the vehicle when it is being driven for services such as insurance, or remote monitoring for prognostics and predictive maintenance, arguably, the importance of the OBD connector is increasing for these telematics services – even if the data it can provide is restricted in relation to what is available via the vehicle manufacturers’ embedded
    telematics systems.

    Further requirements
    Once data is accessed, the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into force in May this year, will impose further requirements for the use and handling of personal data.  A fundamental issue will be that much of the data contained in the vehicle can also be considered personal data and is subject to data protection legislation. Critically, the customer must give their consent to the use of this data by a positive action or statement – it cannot be assumed.    

    As you can see, it may be ‘so far, so good’, but the simple task of continuing to plug into the 16 pin connector and diagnosing or repairing the vehicle is going to be far from simple, with many hurdles and challenges yet to be addressed, but the aftermarket associations, both in the UK and with their pan-European partners, are continuing to fight for the ability to do so.


    xenconsultancy.com

  • Vehicle Type Approval revisions: Threat or opportunity? 

    Following last month’s article concerning the evolution of the whole aftermarket value chain, based on remote access to a vehicle, the importance of the recently revised Vehicle Type Approval legislation should not be underestimated – and nor should the efforts involved in achieving some of these changes be taken for granted.  

    This is important on several levels – firstly on the technical requirements that this new legislation contains, secondly on what this means for both today’s and tomorrow’s aftermarket and thirdly why the UK government needs to be committed to continuing that these new legislative requirements are in place after Brexit.

    Vibrant, innovative and competitive
    The aftermarket represents over two thirds of the vehicle repair and maintenance sector in the UK and the UK government must ensure that this vibrant, innovative and competitive sector can not only continue how it operates today. The sector must also be able to develop future business models as evolving vehicle technology impacts the different ways of accessing the vehicle, its data and the customer.

    The existing (Euro 5) legislation contains important rights of access to repair and maintenance information (RMI). These rights have been (mainly) transferred over into the new EU whole vehicle Type Approval that will come into force in Sept 2020 for new models entering the market. This revised Type Approval legislation (it has not yet been allocated a document number) is based on the existing Type Approval requirements, but also introduces some important new requirements that help the aftermarket. This new legislation will considerably improve the system of access to repair and maintenance information (RMI), for example:

    The continued possibility to communicate with the vehicle’s technical information/data via the standardised on-board diagnostic connector, which is now better clarified and which makes clear that third party service providers should not be barred from accessing vitally important vehicle data when the vehicle is in motion (for read-only functions). This is a good first-step towards the adaptation of our sector with the digital economy and the connected vehicle: “For the purpose of vehicle OBD, diagnostics, repair and maintenance, the direct vehicle data stream shall be made available through the serial data port on the standardised data link connector... When the vehicle is in motion, the data shall only be made available for read-only functions.”

    The information needed for preparation or repair of vehicles for roadworthiness testing has been included into the RMI definition, as this information was not available via the Roadworthiness Directive 2014/45/EU and new test methods that will use the ‘electronic vehicle interface’ will require more technical information;

    An adaptation of the format of the RMI to the state-of-the-art, which means the technical repair information can also be obtained in an electronically processable form – especially useful for technical data publishers and replacement parts catalogue producers;

    A new paragraph that recognises the fast-pace of change of vehicle technologies: Technical progress introducing new methods or echniques for vehicle diagnostics and repair, such as remote access to vehicle information and software, should not weaken the objective of this Regulation with respect to access to vehicle repair and maintenance information for independent operators.

    A new definition of ‘non-discrimination’ that not only includes authorised repairers, but also now the vehicle manufacturers themselves if they also provide repair and maintenance services, “...so as to ensure that the independent vehicle repair and maintenance market as a whole can compete with authorised dealers, regardless of whether the vehicle manufacturer gives such information to authorised dealers and repairers or uses such information for the repair and maintenance purposes itself, it is necessary to set out the details of the information to be provided for the purposes of access to vehicle repair and maintenance information.”

    Empowered
    The revised Type Approval legislation will also introduce increased market surveillance requirements that is aimed at not only checking vehicle emissions compliance following the Dieselgate scandal, but also for the Type Approval of replacement components related to both emission and safety related systems.
        
    The European Commission will also be empowered to consider the remote connection to a vehicle; “...to take account of technical and regulatory developments or prevent misuse by updating the requirements concerning the access to vehicle OBD information and vehicle repair and maintenance information, including the repair and maintenance activities supported by wireless wide area networks,” (this is using the mobile ‘phone operator networks, as already used for today’s ‘connected car’).
        
    So, the EU aftermarket associations – ably assisted by their UK members, have fought to get some important elements in the new legislation. This is good but – and there is always a ‘but’ – this legislative text provides a good basis to address some of the key issues facing the aftermarket today, but there is still work to be done – both in Brussels and here in the UK concerning the government’s position to ensure that the requirements of this European legislation remain applicable in the UK after Brexit.
        
    As is often the case, the ‘devil is in the detail’ and in the case of the new Type Approval legislation, this will become part of the ‘technical requirements’ that will be developed and defined in the ‘Delegated Acts and Technical Annexes’ which will be discussed as part of the implementation of this new legislation. This will include important topics, such as using security certificates to access data via the OBD port, which must also include a legislative process to avoid vehicle manufacturers implementing difficult, restrictive, anti-competitive or costly schemes, or simply mandating that you register your customers with your competitor (the VM) before you can offer your services.

    There will also be other legislation which may impact the technical requirements of this Type Approval revision, such as GDPR (much vehicle generated data is considered personal data), the digital single market, B2B platforms – all of which will also become familiar aspects of your new business models in the future. [ends]

    Clearly, much new EU legislation is on the way and it is vital that the UK Government ensures that these important RMI provisions are ‘carried over’ in the vehicle Type Approval, as well as in other related legislative requirements, after Brexit.

    The future of the aftermarket is rapidly moving into being part of the wider digital economy – and the aftermarket cannot survive in this ‘shark infested’ sector without legislative support – so support the aftermarket associations – they have done good work so far, but there is still much work yet to be done.

    xenconsultancy.com

  • Brexit and BER: IMPACT 

    What are the possible outcomes of Brexit for the UK aftermarket and should we be concerned?

  • Certifying your future 

    The rate at which the modern car is developing to include new functions based on new technologies is exponential.

    The car owner is often unaware of this, as they see only the ‘HMI’ (human machine interface) that allows them to select and control functions and along with many other electronically controlled ‘things’, the expectation is that ‘it just works’.

    Two key elements are changing with today’s and tomorrow’s cars. Firstly, they are changing into more sophisticated, interactive electronic systems, which require high levels of software compliance. Frequently this can mean that the vehicle needs ‘updating’ which may apply to one system or the complete vehicle. Today this is increasingly conducted by using standardised interface (vehicle communication interfaces – VCI’s) and pass through programming by establishing a direct connection between the vehicle and the vehicle manufacturer’s website. This is now being used even at the level of replacing basic components, such as a battery or engine management system components.

    Secondly, vehicles are increasingly being connected through telematics systems so that the car is becoming part of ‘the internet of things’. This allows remote communication with the vehicle to provide a range of new services to the vehicle owner, driver, or occupants. These broadly fall into two categories – consumer related services, such as internet radio stations, link to e-mails, finding the nearest free parking space and much more, or business related access to in-vehicle data to allow remote monitoring of the status of the vehicle for predictive maintenance, remote diagnostics, vehicle use, pay-as-you-drive insurance etc.

    Increasing isolation
    The in-vehicle E/E architecture is therefore not only increasingly complicated and inter-active, it is more vulnerable to incorrect repair processes. To ensure that this risk is minimised, the vehicle manufacturers are increasingly isolating any possible external connections from the in-vehicle communication buses and electronic control modules. Effectively, today’s 16 pin OBD connector will no longer be directly connected to the CAN Bus and in turn to the ECU(s) but will communicate via a secure in-vehicle gateway. There may also be a new standardised connection which becomes a local wireless connection in the workshop as well as having remote telematics connection, but in both cases, the access to in-vehicle data is no longer directly connected.
        
    Why is this isolation and protection of the in-vehicle systems so critical? Apart from the obvious protection against any malicious attack, there is an increasing safety issue. Thinking longer term, what happens when semi-autonomous cars or fully autonomous cars come into your workshop?
        
    The key question is how to conduct effective repairs on these vehicle systems. At first glance, it may be the basic servicing still needs to be done, but even this will become more difficult, with certain items already requiring electronic control or re-setting. As this develops into more sophisticated systems, the vehicle manufacturer may try and impose more control over who is doing what to ‘their’ vehicles, based on their claim that they have a lifetime responsibility of the functionality of the vehicle and therefore need to know who is doing what where and when. This may lead to an increasing requirement for independent operators to have some form of accreditation to ensure sufficient levels of technical competence before being allowed to work on a vehicle. However, there is also a strong argument in many European countries (the UK included) that this is a market forces issue and that it is the choice of the customer who they trust to repair their vehicle and it is the responsibility of the repairer to be adequately trained and equipped.

    What’s coming?
    Will this market forces attitude still continue when the autonomous vehicle systems are part of the intrinsic safety of the vehicle? This is increasingly becoming the case as these semi or fully autonomous systems take over more control of the vehicle and stop any driver control.
       
    Certainly, anyone attempting any DIY repair will find it much more difficult to access the information or the tools/equipment needed to repair their vehicle, as this will be beyond the knowledge and economic reach of the ‘Sunday morning repairer’, but should DIY repairs even be allowed in the future?

    This raises an interesting argument about who should be allowed to work on a vehicle as the correct repair procedures become increasingly critical. Of course, vehicle manufacturers will continue to have full access to the vehicle and it’s systems, which increasingly will be via remote (telematics) access. This may even compromise the access available to authorised repairers (main dealers), but is seen as a necessary requirement to ensure that the vehicle has been repaired correctly and that the in-vehicle software is still functioning correctly.

    The counter argument is that this also provides unacceptable levels of control and monitoring of the complete independent aftermarket – so what could be a solution?

    Controlling competition
    No one is trying to say that safety and security are not important, but there must be a balance as independent operators will continue to need access to diagnostic, repair, service and maintenance information and continue to offer competitive services to the consumer. The European legislator must protect competition, but this may also come with appropriate controls and this may mean that tomorrow’s technicians will need to demonstrate certain levels of competence, together with an audit trail of the work which has been performed in the event of a vehicle malfunction.

    Independent operators already need high levels of technical competence – necessary for the consumer and the effective operation of their own business, but in the future this may also mean a form of licensing or certification that is required by legislation. If this becomes necessary, then it has to be appropriate, reasonable and proportionate.

    The alternative is that the vehicle manufacturer could become the only choice to diagnose, service and repair the vehicles of tomorrow. I am sure we all agree that it is not what we want or need, so it may be that the increasing technology of tomorrow’s vehicles is the reason that the industry should now embrace change to mirror other safety related industry sectors, such as Gas Safe or NICEIC – qualified, competent and registered. The future is changing and the aftermarket needs to change with it.

    Want to know more?
    Find out how Neil’s consultancy for garage owners can benefit you by visiting xenconsultancy.com.

  • ‘Grassroots insight’ plays influential role in crucial Type-Approval legislation vote 

    The European Parliament’s IMCO committee have approved several key amendments to Vehicle Type-Approval legislation proposals, which include the aftermarket maintaining in-vehicle data access via the OBD port.


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