TPS expands network

Published:  20 March, 2018

TPS has expanded its network of centres with two new hubs opening in Bolton and Watford and two existing sites in Birmingham and Cardiff relocating to larger premises.

The new Bolton site is housed in a 5,400sqft building with the capacity to stock up to 6,000 lines of products, which will in turn service a 600 strong customer base within a 25 minute radius of the centre.

Further down south, the new Watford centre opened its doors in January, with the 5,000sqft building housing around 5,000 lines of stock – with capacity for up to 12,000 lines.   With the new and relocated hubs in Bolton, Watford, Birmingham and Cardiff, the number of centres in the TPS network is now at over 80 centres across the UK.

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  • Issues of rotation 

    I received a phone call from another garage: 'We've seen you in the Top Technician magazine and are wondering if you would be interested in looking at an ABS fault for us?' The call went along the usual lines, can the symptoms be recreated? What is the repair history? The vehicle was booked in for me to take a look.

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  • Certifying your future 

    The rate at which the modern car is developing to include new functions based on new technologies is exponential.

    The car owner is often unaware of this, as they see only the ‘HMI’ (human machine interface) that allows them to select and control functions and along with many other electronically controlled ‘things’, the expectation is that ‘it just works’.

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    Want to know more?
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