IGA publishes report investigating garage work providers

Published:  23 April, 2018

The Independent Garage Association (IGA) has published a study of consumer facing websites that provide work to independent garages for a fee.

The 2018 Garage Work Provider Report investigates the wide variety of business models and contractual terms and conditions that consumer work provider websites use. 

Stuart James, IGA Director commented:  “We know that many independent garages perceive the costs of services provided by these work providers as a form of marketing outlay and understand the reasons why they use them.  The aim of this report is to provide sufficient information for garage businesses to make an informed decision on which specific provider is best for their business. 

“The IGA will continue to listen to its members and survey the marketplace to ensure that garage businesses are not subject to any detriment as a result of working with consumer work providers.

Stuart added: “The IGA firmly believes independent garage businesses should continue to engage directly with customers and promote their own brand and image.”

The report is available to download from the IGA website:  www.independentgarageassociation.co.uk

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