Top Garage 2018 winner named – Cedar Garage

Published:  23 June, 2018


Top Garage 2018 has named its winner. Cedar Garage of Worthing was identified as the best business in the brand new competition, which launched this year.

The award was received by co-owners and founders of Cedar Garage, Kevin Pearce and Matthew Copp at the Top Technician/Top Garage Awards.

The final was extremely tight, with four garages vying for the title. Businesses were gauged on customer service, business planning, tools and garage equipment, parts and training.

Cedar Garage, which operates from two sites in the West Sussex seaside town, received an extensive prize package, including items from all the sponsors as well as a cash prize from Aftermarket magazine.

Commenting on their achievement, Kevin said: “We are ecstatic to have won Top Garage. The whole team have worked their socks off, and it is great that their commitment has been recognised in this way.”

Matthew added: “We are so happy to have won. Everyone in the team has the same attitude as us- they want to be the best, and this is a fantastic way to show the work that goes into the business.”

Top Garage has been designed to enable garages to show what makes them the best in the sector and means they will be able receive the same kind of recognition as individual techs have through Top Technician since its foundation in 2002.

Top Technician 2018 and Top Garage 2018 come to you in association with ABC Awards, Auto iQ, the Garage Equipment Association (GEA), the Independent Automotive Aftermarket Federation (IAAF) and the Independent Garage Association (IGA).  

Top Technician 2018 and Top Garage 2018 are sponsored by Pico Technology, Pro-Align, Ring Automotive and Snap-on.

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