Hats on 4 Ben is back!

Published:  27 July, 2018

Ben has revealed  the details of this year’s automotive industry mental health fundraiser!

The campaign looks a little different this year after a design refresh which more clearly shows that Ben is here for the automotive industry, providing support for life to its people. The new name - Hats on 4 Ben - more clearly reflects that the campaign is run by Ben, for Ben, and now takes place on World Mental Health Day. The aim is still exactly the same - to raise money for Ben and help transform mental health support across the automotive industry.

Ben is calling on everyone in the industry to sign their companies up and get their colleagues involved in this fantastic day.

How Hats on 4 Ben works: 1. SIGN UP – we’ll send you a fundraising pack and everything you need to make Hats on 4 Ben a success in your business. Visit www.hatson4ben.co.uk 2. TELL EVERYONE – use our tools to promote the event across the business so everyone marks 10th October in their diary 3. DONATE – everyone taking part donates £2 to Ben through JustGiving or by dropping their donation into a collection box. We make it easy for you to bank the cash after the event. Visit www.hatson4ben.co.uk/donate to find out more. 4. GET INVOLVED – appoint a couple of Hatters to get everyone wearing a hat on 10th October and donating to the Hats on 4 Ben campaign. Post your hat selfies to social media on the day using #HatsOn4Ben.

Now in its third year, Ben hopes the campaign will be even bigger and better, raising more funds to support its life-changing work helping industry colleagues with issues like anxiety and depression. Every £2 donation will help Ben start the conversation about mental health.

Mental health issues can impact anyone at any time, with one in four people affected each year. Ben has seen a sharp increase in automotive industry people asking for help with their mental health each year so is focusing on raising awareness and support to help those who are struggling.

Matt Wigginton, Business Development Director at Ben, said: “Hold on to your hats, it’s back and it’s bigger and better than ever! Each year, we see more and more people in the automotive industry asking us for help with mental health issues like anxiety and depression, so we know there’s more work to be done.

“Together we can transform mental health support across our sector, and that’s where you come in. Please support us by signing your company up today and taking part in Hats on 4 Ben! We’re asking everyone who takes part on World Mental Health Day to donate £2, or as much as you can afford, to help us have much-needed conversations with your colleagues who are struggling. “

Sign up now! Visit: www.hatson4ben.co.uk

Related Articles

  • Mental health and money top worries says Ben report 

    Working age people in the motor industry are contacting Ben in increasing numbers due to financial concerns and mental health challenges according to the charity’s Impact Report for 2017-18 87% of those who contact the organisation to discuss low income, anxiety and depression are in work, according to the latest issue of the annual study.

  • Ben4Business: new business package launched 

    Ben has launched a new package for businesses, called Ben4Business.

  • Ben’s 'Hats on 4 Mental Health Day' fundraiser returns  

    This year's Hats on 4 Mental Health Day, organised by Ben is taking place on 13 October, during the week of World Mental Health Day.

  • Mike Brewer becomes first Ben Celebrity Ambassador 

    Ben has announced that Mike Brewer has become its first ever Ben Celebrity Ambassador. Mike Brewer is renowned in the industry for his role as presenter of Wheeler Dealers, and he is also a journalist, producer, campaigner and motoring enthusiast.

  • Glowing, going, gone! 

    I decided to share this case study for my first article because what I expected to be a simple job turned into something a little more complex and gave me an opportunity to study a and learn about a system that until now I’d probably taken for granted.

    We were presented with a 2010 Skoda Fabia 1.6 TDi by a car dealer who had recently taken it in part exchange. The engine management was light illuminated, however with no other symptoms. The previous owner told the dealer that the MIL had been on for around a year and her local garage had failed to repair it. It had also recently been recalled for the ‘Dieselgate’ VAG emission software update. The dealer told the customer there were DTCs stored for the glow plugs and that they needed replacing to which she declined as she was sure they had previously been replaced. We already had a reasonable amount of vehicle history to start with, and were ready to take a look.

    Voltage and current
    A code read revealed DTCs for all four glow plugs being open circuit and a glow plug module communication fault. A quick inspection of the engine revealed that the glow plugs were not that old and also there was a new glow plug module fitted, plus an old one found in the boot.

    While checking the resistance of the glow plugs may tell us something, measuring the voltage and current with an amps clamp paints a much clearer picture. The oscilloscope was connected and the ignition was cycled. The screen capture revealed a healthy 12 volts for around 10 seconds then pulsed at random, however there was zero amps flowing (on all glow plugs). It was clear the plugs had gone open circuit for some reason so they were removed for inspection. It was then we noticed that the heater plugs fitted were rated at 4.4 volts, so now we know why they burnt out! Could they be the wrong glow plugs? Could it be the wrong control module? We checked and found the part numbers were correct.

    At this point it was crucial that we understood exactly how the system is wired and how it should operate. By studying a wiring diagram we were able to plan how we were going to test the system (see image 1). Starting with the power supplies and ground, it is always best to test a circuit in its normal environment which means we really need the current load of working heater plugs. If we were to fit new heater plugs at this point there was a high risk of them being damaged which is expensive so we substituted four headlamp bulbs instead. The fuse rating for the circuit was 50A so with a quick bit of maths we calculated the current required for four bulbs was safe. The main live feed, ground and ignition switched live were all good so we moved on to the two communication wires that link directly to the PCM.  

    If the PCM can log individual codes for each glow plug then we know that it must have a two-way communication system. Scoping both wires with the module connected and disconnected showed us that there was clearly a command signal from the PCM and although it was random and rather messy (see image 2), the glow module responded directly by activating the glow plugs at the same rhythm.

    The second wire had totally different digital signal which had to be the feedback to the PCM. The noise and irregularity of the command signal was clearly an issue so we checked the wiring back to the PCM and with the aid of the good old-fashioned wriggle test the fault was identified as a poor connection in the PCM harness connector. The connection was cleaned and the system retested which revealed a much healthier scope pattern and the communication DTC was cleared (see image 3).

    Reliable repair
    At this point we could have fitted new glow plugs but to save unnecessary expense we wanted to make sure it was a reliable repair so we decided to monitor the system with the faulty glow plugs still installed and the leads connected to the bulbs. We started by monitoring all four glow plug voltages on the oscilloscope. Using the scan tool to activate the glow plugs showed us that the 4.4 volts is achieved by pulse width modulation at a duty cycle of around 13% with a frequency of around three times per second. What was more interesting was that all four plugs were individually triggered in a sequence (see image 4) so there is never more than one glow plug energised at any one time. The logic behind this is that it makes a substantial reduction in power consumption.

    Our next test was to observe the control strategy of the PCM from a cold start and warm-up phase. The objective here was to ensure that there was no software related issues. From the point of key on there is a 1.5 second supply phase to heat the plug as fast as possible then temperature is maintained by the 13% duty control.

    Decade box
    Of course, after a period of time, once the engine starts to warm up the system turns off and the communication wires go quiet. If you want to test it more than once then you’d have to wait for the engine to cool so to save time we connected a decade box in place of the engine coolant temperature sensor and by observing the coolant temperature in serial data on the scan tool we were able to select a variety of resistances that would represent low temperatures and fool the PCM into commanding glow plug activation.

    The decade box has proved to be an extremely useful tool really is a must in any diagnostic technician’s tool box. It is great for substituting in place of certain sensors and components to check the integrity of a circuit or to observe an ECU responding to a variation in signal (resistance).

    The final test was an observation of voltage over current on one glow plug. The other interesting thing we noticed was the simplicity of the digital feedback signal. By unplugging each glow in turn you could see the pattern in the signal change and when all were connected and working it was a regular pattern.

    Summing up
    Clearly more time was spent on this job than necessary and the labour charge remained fair. In a busy workshop it is hard to find spare time for these situations but my point is that sometimes sacrificing a lunch hour or staying behind for half an hour gives an opportunity to learn so much which can only aid you in speeding up diagnostic time and process on future jobs.

    Winning the Top Technician 2017 competition was unexpected. It has not only introduced me to some very inspiring, like-minded people, but has also taught me you can never have too much training, whether it’s self-training like in this instance or on a professional training course. There are some fantastic training companies offering a variety of courses available now. Also, some of the best and most respected all regularly write for Aftermarket!  





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