The future of DPF servicing

Change can seem shocking at first, but is it the future?

By Frank Massey | Published:  08 May, 2017

Two months from now will bring my tenure in the motor industry to 49 years. I would like to think I have evolved, kept up with technology, enabling me to provide a professional service, enjoying customer respect and integrity. My focus has been the technical challenges, while my son David manages the commercial responsibilities.

This creates a wide role for me developing our training programme, internal research and development, bringing the focus of this topic to technical and legal compliance.

My chosen subject here is diesel servicing and repairs, specifically particulate filtration and emission control. It is something we have been passionate and vocal over for several years. it gives me no pleasure or satisfaction in seeing our prediction over the demise of diesel vehicles.

Diesel fudge

The future is now clear as to the changes our political lords and masters have in mind. This gives us a short timeline to get our house in order. My intention is to advise, help and warn what will happen if we all continue to fudge diesel particulate repairs as we currently do. Upwards of 90% of independent garages will fall into this category. How do, or should we service and recover diesel particulate filters? The choices are very simple!

1. Replace with a new OE filter

2. Replace with a non-OE filter

3. Clean and service off vehicle in factory controlled conditions

4. Clean and service off the vehicle in house

5. Clean and service on the vehicle

6. Remove the filtration system from the vehicle

Here is the problem; we as professional repairers are legally and financially responsible, and exposed for the advice and decisions we make. This is the case even if the customer agrees and or instructs us on a certain course of action.

Clear legislation is in place for the performance and fitment of diesel emission systems. Vehicle taxation is based on specific emission levels agreed with the manufacturers. I am sure I do not need to mention VW and Audi, but I will bet their corporate accountants have regrets. How long do you think it will be before the government bean counters look at us? Let's not fool ourselves enforcement will take the effect of stringent fines.

Everything

So what are we doing wrong? Pretty much everything. Please remember my words, help, advice and not critique.

We are breaking the law in removing legally compliant systems. MOT examiners will lose their licence by passing unauthorised emission system modification. You will become the first unpaid enforcers.

We are breaking the law further in polluting the water course, by power cleaning, or rinsing out cleaning agents into the drains. Utility companies have powers to set huge fines and often do.

We are also in breach of the clean air act by using some of the available cleaning agents that require the running of the engine whilst emitting all the contaminants back into the environment.

It is quite possible at this point some of you are about to rip out the magazine pages and offer an alternative use for them. Please reconsider, we are slowly killing ourselves.

Let's as an industry get together, think ahead of the curve and get our house and process in order.

Change

I recently visited CERAMEX in Slough, and before a handful out there suspect a paid endorsement here, I even paid my own travel expenses. I have been aware of several companies offering off vehicle cleaning, pressure washing, thermal cleaning in an oven, and ultrasonic treatments. My problem has always been, is the catalytic converter and DPF still fully functional and durable when refitted? How can we protect ourselves from future premature failure due to other indirect causes? Can we provide certification of test results?

Here is my opinion as to how we should address the blocked, cleaning DPF problem. Many of you will not agree, I do not care, this is how it should and eventually will be done. Reflect on the vast changes in the paint refinishing industry before you cry never!

The DPF is initially visually examined bar coded and weighed, attached by means of bespoke plumbing to what is in effect a big dishwasher (sorry Marcus my words) then filled with water. A short pause here, some of you will know water damages and degrades the precious metal wash coat. The purified water has all the damaging trace elements removed and is only used to restrict the clear DPF passages. Pressure waves, are then sent through the core, XPURGE for several minutes. I did question if this was in effect an ultrasonic process? This is not the case. The water does act as a transport mechanism for the waste material, including ash, which is flushed out, into a waste tank. The water is filtered, for reuse and the semi solids captured in large skips for reprocessing. It is pure carbon it would make an ideal fuel source!

The DPF core is then placed in electric air dryers where apart from drying the core, measurements are taken for flow rates and back pressure. Next a two-stage photograph examination is applied to detect face off and ring off cracking to the core. A second weight check is taken to ascertain the mass of soot ash removal. The next service is optional for small vehicle units, the cat and DPF are subject to a sample hot gas bench to establish the reduction of, CO/HC, finally being placed in a particulate bench where filtration is assessed and measured.

Certification

Certification and bespoke transport packaging completes the service. The recovery success is consistently above 90%. The cost is approximately half the cost of a new OE unit. No environmental pollution so your grandchildren will thank you and may avoid the huge increase in paediatric respiratory illnesses.

You will earn profit from a professional repair, enjoy the respect and integrity it brings, however not all customers will agree or want to pay, and that is not our problem.

Further information

Please contact Annette 01772 201 597, enquries@ads-global.co.uk for further information on upcoming training courses and events.

Related Articles

  • Classic move 

    All my recent writing has involved modern cars and techniques, but this month I have decided to write about my main passion of classic cars. The classic car market is huge and people are now seeing a lot of classic cars as an investment.

    All my recent writing has involved modern cars and techniques, but this month I have decided to write about my main passion of classic cars. The classic car market is huge and people are now seeing a lot of classic cars as an investment.

    Recently I set about scouring eBay and Gumtree for a restoration project or ‘barn find’ as people like to classify anything that has stood unused for a length of time. The reason for the project is that it is my Dad’s 70th birthday was just before Christmas and what better present than a dusty and rusty old MGB GT? The British classic is top of my shopping list. Dad used to have a white MGB GT and I have always wanted an affordable classic so I have come to the conclusion that the MGB fits the bill perfectly.

    Luckily I have found the perfect car. A lot of money can be lost due to poor bodywork issues. Welding is definitely not my forte, but luckily this particular MGB is solid underneath. That said, the interior needs a good clean and some repair and the engine requires a good service and tune up. The previous owner hadn’t used the car for over seven years but the little 1.8 litre engine ignited just fine. Admittedly it was running slightly lumpily, but it was drivable and solid for well under £1,000. In my eyes it was an absolute bargain.

    As I write this I haven’t yet unveiled the car to Dad but I have ordered the parts catalogues with a view to what this ‘blank canvas’ can become. I am keen on a Sebring kit and Minilites. While getting a complete respray, the exterior paint is as dull as a wet February day. However, I keep having to remember that it is a present and not my car. I will certainly push what I think is best for the car.

    Connection
    Over the years I have restored and re-commissioned plenty of vehicles.  It is something I thoroughly enjoy doing and means you can really implement simple engineering techniques such as turning the mixture screw on a carburettor. I always feel that when a classic car comes in for work that the owner has a closer connection with this vehicle rather than their everyday one. I enjoy communicating with the owner in how they would like to restore the car, cars such as the iconic British Mini and MGB can be customised without losing their vintage style. Parts are so plentiful for most classics that there isn’t that time delay when restoring.
        
    The MGB GT I have purchased comes with a thorough and plentiful file full of receipts mounting up to tens of thousands of pounds, and this certainly is not uncommon. Classic cars are a great chance for escapism in this modern world where an OBD port is the most commonly used part of the car. Instead I get to  enjoy being able to tune an engine with just a flat head screwdriver.





  • Good vibrations  

    In a previous topic I expanded on the availability of focused test tools for independents. It’s not often that we see a technical breakthrough which has real application potential, but there was a breakthrough recently when Pico introduced a new NVH kit. It has come just in time, as noise, vibration and harshness is a challenge that’s not getting any easier, so what is it?

    You must first start by accepting that the motor vehicle is a series of mechanical systems in permanent conflict. There are components travelling in different directions, subject to acceleration, deceleration, changing direction, and of considerable mass differential.

    What I have just described there is the internal combustion engine. adding chassis and body systems to the mix. I think you will agree the problem we have is in identifying noise and vibration.

     The difference between noise and vibration is based on frequency and amplitude. Noise is a single event with a diminishing synodal pattern. It looks like a trumpet. Vibration however has a repetitive frequency and amplitude. Both of which will change with speed and a whole host of influences, resonance, beating, and mass differential are just some.  

    So why has it become more difficult for us techs to bend our ear and diagnose an issue with confidence? The answer is due to the technical innovations of today’s vehicles. These include the dual mass flywheel, active engine mounts, cylinder cancellation, Audi anc system, infinite computer control of chassis dynamics, and the most obvious of all-  lack of accessibility.

    Let’s begin with the basics. As we have seen, Vibration is classified by frequency and amplitude. A large mass will by nature have a lower frequency and a greater mass, while  a small mass will present the exact opposite. Two or more mass that converge with the same frequency combine their mass value increasing the amplitude. This is called resonance. Mass that have a similar but close frequency differential, within say 10hz, cause beating; “wo, wo, wo, wo.” An example of this would be a worn wheel bearing.
    Vibration has three elements: Cause, transfer path, and respondent. In almost all cases we experience the respondent. Let’s think about the vibrating ash tray, wedged with paper to stop the noise! Vibration also falls into three other simple categories, vibration we feel, vibration we see, and vibration we hear. We humans can only hear noise between 25hz/22,000hz.

    The next consideration is how many events per rotation frequency is experienced these are called, first, second, third, orders etc.
    Now let’s do some simple maths. It’s getting interesting now isn’t it? We must convert everything into frequency, the unit is hertz, or cycles per second. For simplicity, a four-cylinder engine revolving at 3000rpm, in top gear 1:1, differential ratio 4:1.
    3000/60=50hz divided by final drive ratio 4:1=12.5hz.

    Therefore crankshaft vibration will be @50hz and tyres, rim, brake disc, and drive shafts will be at 12.5hz. So, you will now appreciate is a simple matter of separating the various operating frequencies.

    Well not quite, but by now I’m hoping you view vibration in a more clinical way and not just based on experience or opinion. Vibration can have different direction or vectors, something tyre fitters more often or not get wrong.

    Bring on the technology. The kit which can have an infinite flexibility of accessory options, uses a three-dimensional accelerometer, for vector differential, measuring mass, and a microphone recording sound, together with 1+3 channel interfaces, and bnc connection leads. The engine speed data is collected via the serial port with a drew tech mongoose serial interface. This can also be achieved optically if preferred. The accelerometer has a magnetic base and is directional sensitive, fore/aft, vertical, and lateral. Its initial position should be on the driver’s seat frame. After all that’s where the complaints start! The microphone could be positioned close to a known noise source or in the cabin.

    Navigating through the software wizard is straightforward, you will need to select number of cylinders and configuration, in line, opposed, v config, and direction of mounting. You will then need to establish the various gear and final drive ratios, with tyre size data.

    The software will then gather data over an infinite timeframe and scaling which is of course adjustable. The most challenging aspect in my opinion is control of the style of driving technique, speed, gearing, direction, braking and the influence of the road surface. The vehicle may have selectable drivetrain and suspension options, which will affect the potential effects of noise and vibration.

    Did you remember not to omit the obvious or obscure effects? Has the vehicle been modified in any way whatsoever? Wheel size, spring rates, power output, etc, etc. Record your driving technique and environmental influences into the microphone. After all it is recording sound, all sound!

    There are several options in the display menu, from bar chart, frequency, and 3D. you will quickly establish exactly which one of three vehicle systems the problem originates based on visual evidence. Engine, transmission or tyres.
    You can then reposition the sensors to further locate the position of the source. Vibration will increase in amplitude, as will noise the closer you are to the source. This is due to the reduction in the length of the transfer path, and any devices that may absorb it.  
    I can confidently monitor discrete combustion anomalies based on the transfer of mass energy from the pistons to crankshaft orders, simplifying connectivity issues with coil on plug multi-cylinder engines. I could show you images from a test I conducted recently, but a simple static image does not fully demonstrate the effects of vibration.



  • High voltage – Big opportunity: Part 1 

    Electric vehicle technology means both opportunity for garages and technicians but also necessitates investment, especially in technicians and equipment as businesses have a ‘duty of care’ to look after the technician while servicing and repairing electric vehicles.
        
    Who here is old enough to remember when the supposedly deadly airbag was introduced on mainstream production vehicles during the 1990s? Nearly everyone around during this era was nervous of the technology and the highly dangerous components, such as the airbag deployment device, that were encountered by technicians. Today airbag technology is encountered by the workshop technician on a daily basis, and every modern vehicle has some form of supplementary restraint system (SRS) fitted to the vehicle. The dangers first feared by the technician are now treated as part of the daily routine. It will probably be a similar scenario as more and more high voltage electric vehicles are seen both on the road and in vehicle workshops for service and repair around the UK.
        
    Treat the vehicle technology with care, educate the technician, gain confidence with the technology and the fear typically reduces. Most vehicles (hybrid and pure electric) fitted with this high voltage technology are inherently safe, reliable and safe to work on providing a few rules are adhered to such as ‘don’t stick metal objects in places where high voltage exists.’
        
    Many of the vehicle manufacturers will highlight the potential dangers by placing various warning signs on the hazardous components that have a risk of electrocution, corrosive, fire and magnetism.

    Training
    Many of the training providers around the UK are now providing training courses on the technology, most will provide an industry recognised qualification or certification by a recognised awarding organisation such ABC Awards, City & Guilds or The Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI). The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has developed guidelines for the recovery, repair, and maintenance of these vehicles both for independent workshops and franchised dealership networks which is available to view at http://www.hse.gov.uk/mvr/topics/electric-hybrid.htm
        
    The HSE website can also provide some useful information that can supplement the information provided on specific High Voltage Vehicle training/qualification courses. The workshop should have the applicable policies in place and ensure that the necessary risk assessment procedures are in place to prevent injuries and fatalities. They should also inform the applicable insurance organisation(s) that they are working on these types of vehicles.
        
    It should be noted as with all the present vehicle technology that the vehicle’s control unit will closely monitor the high voltage system and in nearly all cases of a fault being detected, the vehicle system will store an applicable diagnostic trouble code (DTC) and default to a safe running mode or even shut the high voltage system down, disabling the vehicle. The control unit will also illuminate a malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) to indicate the fault to the driver of the vehicle.

    Correct
    It is therefore imperative that the vehicle workshop has the correct test equipment to be able to access the vehicle systems necessary to retrieve the information to correctly repair the vehicle. Only with dedicated equipment will a workshop be able to facilitate the diagnosis and repair of the vehicle. This also includes the necessary personal protective equipment (PPE) and necessary dedicated hand tools such as a multimeter, insulation tester, insulated tools and the necessary workshop equipment to both repair the vehicle and warn individuals of the potential risk to the exposure of electrocution through high voltage vehicles (i.e. insulated safety equipment, signs and barriers).
        
    Hybrid vehicles have been fitted with high voltage batteries since the late 1990s such as the Honda Insight/Accord or the Toyota Prius (now in its fourth generation). The high voltage technology has been seen for many years, its only over the last few years that we have seen that technology being used more widely on vehicles that our customers drive on a daily basis.

    Safety steps
    To enable a technician to disable the high voltage system to be able to work near/on the high voltage components they should always follow the vehicle manufacturers repair instructions however this can also be seen as ‘seven steps’ to disable the vehicle’s high voltage system. Step 1 to Step 3 are indicated in this article with the remainder in the next article.

    Step 1. Ensure others are aware of the potential high voltage/risk: The technician should ensure that others in their workplace are aware of the potential dangers of a vehicle with high voltage in the workshop. The technician has a duty of care to highlight the potential risks and hazards. The technician should perform this task by highlighting to others of the potential danger, indicating that the vehicles’ high voltage system is either ‘active’ or disabled. This can be achieved by applying warning signs on the vehicle along with their name and contact details such as a mobile phone number. The technician should walk around the vehicle to check to ensure there is no obvious damage, liquids or other risks that could harm others. The technician should at the same time begin/follow a risk assessment identifies the potential hazards (HSE indicate that a business that employs five staff and above needs this to be documented). The technician should place additional signs and barriers to enable the vehicle is cordoned off and ensure that others are protected as far as possible from the risk.

    Step 2. Switch off the ignition switch/remove the key from the vehicle (3-5 metres away): Hybrid vehicles typically use a vehicle security system that no longer requires the vehicles key (or key fob) to be inserted into a lock assembly to switch the ‘ignition on’ or make the vehicle ready to drive. Many vehicles now have keyless technology so as long as the key is in the vicinity of the vehicle the vehicle ‘could’ become alive. A simple solution is to remove the key (or key fob) at least three metres from the vehicle so that the vehicle does not recognise the key and there is no fear on the vehicle energy unit (engine or high voltage battery system) becoming live. As an example it has been seen that a technician drains the engine oil on a vehicle during a service and the engine starts, the consequences of such an action can be enormous. This scenario could also occur if the vehicle is fitted with a Stop/Start system that is active.

    Step 3. Disconnect the low voltage battery:  Vehicles, at present, will still have a low voltage (12 volt) ancillary battery to operate conventional systems such as driver and passenger control systems i.e. instruments, comfort and audio. The low voltage system will also typically control and monitor the high voltage system. Therefore, if the low voltage battery were to become discharged then the vehicle will display the signs of a flat battery and the technician will have to connect their ‘battery booster’ to the low voltage battery in order to wake up the high voltage system.
        
    On NO account should the technician access the high voltage battery to connect any booster/charging equipment. The low voltage battery is typically re-charged with a component called the DC to DC converter. This is normally located near to the invertor/electric motor. Note that a battery (low or high voltage) can only store direct current (DC) and to propel the vehicle requires this DC to be inverted into AC to turn the electric motor through a component referred to as the ‘inverter.’ Late vehicles could be seen as no longer fitted with a low voltage battery, vehicle manufacturers are looking to increase the driving range of the vehicle through weight reduction. A low voltage battery typically weighs around 12Kg. The lithium battery will provide both the low
    voltage and the high voltage energy required to energise the vehicle.
        Voltages present in hybrid and electric are significantly higher (up to 650 Volts-DC)) than those used in other vehicles (12/24 Volts DC) we commonly see on the road network. In dry conditions, accidental contact with parts that are live at voltages above 50 Volts DC can be fatal. If wet conditions are encountered, then this voltage can become significantly reduced. These vehicles remain inherently safe but as vehicle workshops can be high risk the workshop should always have a trained/qualified first aid person on site. High voltage will also apply to the various equipment that has been used for many years in this environment.
        
    The high voltage output is controlled by the low voltage system with the use of ‘contactors’ or large relays. These relays can be seen as large mechanical switches and due to the large currents, that pass through the contacts can be prone to faults such as welding closed. The vehicle low voltage system will typically check the function of these relays during the start-up procedure and if a fault is detected the system will normally produce a DTC applicable to the fault.

    Further information
    Further information on high voltage vehicle components and their operation will be contained in the next of the articles in this series, along with the next steps in the disconnection process. The reading of these articles will increase a technician’s knowledge of high voltage and the various vehicle systems, but a technician should always ensure that they have the ability to work on these vehicle types competently prior to work commencing.

  • The changing face of the Aftermarket 

    Arguably the world’s largest and most successful aftermarket show was recently held in Frankfurt – Automechanika.
        
    If you didn’t go, you missed something very impressive, but there will be various reports about what was there and details of specific exhibitors and their latest product or service in this most noble magazine.
        
    However, although I spent most of a week at this exhibition, what intrigued me was not just the enormous variety of exhibitors, with their corresponding products, services and new ideas, but the wider question of why it is so successful and why so many visitors – over 130,000 this year - attend this bi-annual show out of their busy schedules. Most importantly, well over two thirds of these are senior business managers or business owners with 96% stating that they were “very satisfied’”with their visit to the show. Doesn’t this start to tell you something very important?
        
    It starts to show why exhibitions are so important, especially at this moment in the history of the aftermarket, and why it is increasingly important to attend this type of show. Let me explain.

    Evolution
    For over a century the aftermarket has continuously evolved and primarily provides consumers with competitive choices about the diagnosis, service and maintenance of the vehicles – generating healthy competition and impressive innovation along the way. If evidence was ever needed as to how important this is, then Automechanika shows this in abundance. Whole halls (several on three levels) exhibit specific sectors of the aftermarket and the Automechanika organisers help the visitor by keeping all similar products or services in a dedicated area or hall. Believe me, this really helps when planning what you want to see and how to find it, but equally reflects the needs of the visitors who plan their visits almost like a military operation. However, there were some important differences with this year’s show as there was an interesting dichotomy. For the first time, there was a significant retrospective view with older (classic) vehicles in a dedicated hall and at other stands around the show. This was to illustrate that growing skills gap in what is a lucrative and resurgent market, but was also clearly based on the B2B opportunities that servicing and maintaining these cars can create.
        
    From the opposite perspective, there was much evidence of new technologies and the rapid revolution that is taking place towards the garage of the future. Perhaps these two elements summarise nicely the question of why so many senior people go to this show – it enables them to understand the threats and opportunities in relation to their businesses and equally, flowing from this, where and when investment in their businesses should take place. This leads into how their businesses can remain competitive, which can be a combination of exploiting new digital technologies to create higher workshop efficiencies, implementing improved tools and equipment or understanding how improved work methods using internet and cloud based solutions can reduce the costs.

    Competition
    On the other side of the equation is the wider competition issue of how to remain in the position to offer competitive choices to the consumer, as the ability to remain competitive could be under severe threat from changes to the vehicle design, access conditions and new competitors entering the market.
        
    Automechanika represents the epitome of the aftermarket’s success, but is viewed by the vehicle manufacturers as a rich opportunity to encroach into the aftermarket sector and ‘take back’ what they consider should be rightfully theirs.
        
    As I have written about before, this is part of the connected car and allows the vehicle manufacturer to control all remote access to the vehicle. You may consider that this is not your problem, as you repair vehicles when they come into your workshop, but what is happening now is that the start of this repair process starts with vehicle manufacturers’ applications embedded in the vehicle, monitoring what faults or service requirements are needed and then proposing via the in-vehicle display a location and price where the service or repair can be conducted – the driver just clicks  the icon and ‘voila’, the appointment is made at the nearest main dealer. You can’t compete if you can’t make a competitive offer as you don’t know what is needed and cannot contact the driver at the time the vehicle manufacturers are making their proposal.

    Access
    So, the aftermarket is evolving, but in a way that may not be obvious until it is too late. Independent service providers can manage their businesses to remain competitive with each other, but there is a distortion with which they cannot compete and with a competitor who wants to control the whole aftermarket value chain and its corresponding profit margins. Without being able to communicate with the vehicle, access its data and use the in-vehicle interface to communicate with the driver, all independent service providers (workshops, parts suppliers, data publishers – i.e. the complete aftermarket value chain) will be unable to offer competing offers, as they will not be able to pre-diagnose the vehicle and identify the parts or technical information required before the vehicle comes into the workshop.
        
    This remote access can reduce workshop costs by 50% and the corresponding competitiveness of any service you may wish to provide.
        
    This is not a ‘let market forces rule’ scenario, but is a real threat to the ability of the whole aftermarket to continue to offer consumers competitive choices and is an excellent example of the ‘primary market’ being able to dominate the ‘secondary market’ – a similar situation to the famous Microsoft Explorer case, where once you had made your choice of a PC, the only choice for an internet search engine was from Microsoft. To address the problem of monopolistic control in the aftermarket, we need the same support from the legislator as they enacted with Microsoft – ensure that there is the ability to implement a competitive choice and let the consumer choose.
        
    Only if legislation supports this basic principle of undistorted competition, will the Aftermarket be able to continue to do what it does best – make innovative, competitive and appealing offers to vehicle owners as well as putting on a great show – in every sense of the word.
    xenconsultancy.com

  • How’s the health of your business? 

    In my line of work I meet a lot of great garage owners. Dedicated men and women,  all committed to repairing their clients’ vehicles to a high standard. They’re intelligent, hard working and persistent people many of which have been in business a good few years.
        
    With all of this in their favour you would imagine that they would be spending their free time pondering the length of their next yacht, or whether they should winter in the Alps or Rockies? Unfortunately this is often not the case, and it’s not uncommon to be asked “How can I increase the financial success of my business?”
        
    We all know that an unfeasibly large income doesn’t buy you happiness, far from it. But I do know this. A healthy business is a profitable business, and a profitable business not only buys you less stress, it buys you choices and options on how you spend your days.  Would you like more options? If so read on.
        
    Back to that question. “How can my business be more financially successful?”
        
    ‘More’ is a dangerous word and it’s often not attained. A better question would be “What is the maximum revenue, profit and personal income that my business can generate in its current form?”
        
    It is something that a lot of business owners haven’t contemplated. But you really should. Only when you know this, can you decide if your current business is performing at it’s best, and is the vehicle to get you to where you need be financially.
        
    The good news is you don’t need to be an accountant to calculate your maximum net labour revenue. Just using the available hours to sell your labour rate and the number of technicians your employ will get you a long way in the right direction. Take an average hourly rate of £55. It could probably be higher but we’ll come to that in due course. This will yield a maximum net income of £422,000 a year from labour sales with four technicians. If your garage is reaching that level of income (£105,000 per tech) at that labour rate, then you should give yourself a rather large pat on the back. Nice one! Not reaching that? That’s incredibly common. In fact if your garage has a net labour revenue of around 54% of your maximum, then you’ll not be alone as that’s the average for a business when we start to work with them on our business development programme.
        
    Why so low? Why are business owners leaving £50,000 per technician on the table? There are a plethora of reasons but I find the most common answer is one of focus. They’re just focusing on the wrong things.
        
    It’s natural. In fact it’s perfectly understandable why a garage owner focuses on the technical aspect of their business. You know that if you don’t fix the cars in a timely manner to a high standard that your income will suffer and your customers won’t return. So of course you’re interested in technical tools and the latest workshop wizardry that’ll enable you to complete a job that you couldn’t without it, or the same job in less time. But let’s be honest (we’re friends after all) is this laser-like focus healthy? Are you too focused on the next tool, the next gadget, the next BIG THING to the cost of your business? All too often I find that a garage owner is and it’s costing you.

    If you’re not measuring it…
    All that is required is a change of focus. The success of your business is in the data, and if you would like to claw back that £50k per technician (or at least a large chunk of it) then learning how to measure the right data and use it to your advantage is essential. After all: If you’re not measuring it, you can’t improve it.
     
    So, you want to increase your income and profit, what should you be measuring? Here are a couple of metrics to get you started.


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