HunterNet: Intelligent four wheel alignment

Published:  07 September, 2017

HunterNet is a cloud based software tool available on Hunter imaging aligners, equipped with the WinAlign operating system. Through the use of HunterNet, alignment information can be rapidly collected and collated. Results can then be transferred to both customers and front-of-house staff, along with additional data for reporting and examination.

HunterNet’s in-built statistics and report capabilities allow swift analysis of the number of work opportunities identified against the number successfully converted into paying jobs. Comparisons can be made between multiple sites or multiple work bays for business planning, benchmarking and management purposes.


www.pro-align.co.uk

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    This year’s summer was good, but as usual, was over too quickly – so back to work and a reality check!
        
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    So, with no wi-fi in the hotel room, I had some time on my hands, so I started thinking about the connections we expect in today’s connected world and in turn what connections are needed to run today’s workshop. This got me thinking about the problems it would face if these connections were either expensive, were restricted, didn’t work as they should or didn’t exist at all.

    Form over function
    Back in the 1990s I remember well being handed a new portable diagnostic tool which could connect to the internet via the mobile phone networks. Subsequently, it was able to conduct remote and bi-directional diagnostics on a vehicle anywhere in the world, when the vehicle was also connected to the internet – effectively ‘PC anywhere’ technology. However, I also clearly remember complaining to the development engineer within a couple of minutes because the functionality was too slow. He was visibly shocked and was clearly offended by my negative feedback on what was his pride and joy. Then I realised what had made me comment negatively – it was not the impressive technology, but the speed of use and the corresponding ability to run the diagnostics I wanted to conduct. In IT terms, this is referred to as system ‘functionality’ and ‘non-functionality’. Simply, the ‘non-‘functionality’ is the design of the system and the ‘functionality’ is what it can deliver. It might be easier to remember this in layman’s terms as being ‘Form over function’.
        
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    Don’t miss the ‘bus’
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    Have a cookie
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    Control
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  • How’s the health of your business? 

    In my line of work I meet a lot of great garage owners. Dedicated men and women,  all committed to repairing their clients’ vehicles to a high standard. They’re intelligent, hard working and persistent people many of which have been in business a good few years.
        
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    If you’re not measuring it…
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