40-year old classic vehicles exempted from MOT

Published:  29 September, 2017

From May next year, vehicles over 40 years old will no longer need to receive an MOT inspection.

The Department for Transport (DfT) has concluded that vehicles over the age of 40 will be exempted form the test on a rolling basis going forward.

At present, all vehicles made before 1960 are excused from taking the annual roadworthiness testing, representing 197,000 vehicles on the UK’s roads. They will be joined by an additional 293,000 vehicles from May 2018.

The government performed a consultation on the issue. 1,130 of those who responded were opposed to the plan while 889 supported the change.

Despite the weight of opinion being on the side of keeping the MOT for the vehicles in question, the government pressed ahead with the change.

Vehicles of this age are “usually maintained in good condition and used on few occasions” according to the DfT.”

Transport minister, Jesse Norman added: “After considering the responses, we have decided to exempt most vehicles over forty years old from the requirement for annual road-worthiness testing. This means lighter vehicles and those larger vehicles such as buses which are not used commercially.

 “Vehicles that have been substantially changed, regardless of their age, will not be exempt from annual roadworthiness testing.”

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