Part two: Powering down

Finding a new energy provider will bring down bills for your business. You can do it yourself, but seeking out advice can be a good idea

By Adam Bernstein | Published:  17 February, 2018

With rising energy bills comes the need to invest time in seeking out the best deal. While finding a new energy provider isn’t a money-making exercise, it is something that will lower costs. It is something that can be done alone, but sometimes two heads are better than one.

This is because unlike the domestic market, the business energy supply works in a way that makes a quick online comparison not so simple. While the domestic market is largely based on location, Chris Caffery, an advisor at Utility Options Ltd, an independent energy consultancy, says the commercial market uses a number of elements that determine the tariff cost: “There is a varied mix of wholesale rates, transportation costs, government taxes and levies and, of course, profit for the suppliers. Generators still rely heavily on coal, oil and gas, so actual or anticipated costs of these fuels can create large differences in retail prices.”

Go compare?
Going online to make a comparison isn’t easy. There are a great many more online comparison websites for domestic energy than there are for commercial suppliers. “One of the main reasons for this,” says Chris, “is that domestic tariffs set by suppliers have a longer ‘shelf life’ usually due to a slightly higher margin placed on domestic for this very reason.”

Other factors are considered such as credit rating (because firms are effectively borrowing from the supplier), and the length of contract (a deal may be poorer at first but over time this improves as market prices rise). Using a broker or consultant doesn’t always guarantee price transparency though; it’s not easy to compare the price that’s being offered unless there’s a change in broker, particularly if the negotiations are happening a day or two before renewal. The advice? Don’t leave negotiations until just before the renewal is due as it doesn’t give an opportunity to shop around.

As to what could be saved, Chris offers two examples: “We’ve been helping a large motor vehicle repair specialist in Kent that employs 25 staff. Last year alone we saved 21% for that customer which equated to around £2,800 in monetary terms.”

The second example involves another Kentish firm, a medium sized garage in Ashford. “We consistently save them around 11% over and above their supplier’s renewal prices. This saving works out at around £600 per annum.”

Chris says that using a consultant isn’t just about the rates that are negotiated. It’s about saving time and not to having to deal with suppliers – “sometimes the extra added services can far outweigh the visual savings on the utility bills.”

Clearly, there are a number of lessons that can be drawn. Plan well in advance for benchmarking and renewing (switching) contracts. The energy companies would much prefer customers on standard tariffs, but with some planning and effort, decent savings can be made.

Getting redress
In the majority of instances the energy supply relationship works out well, but where there’s a suspicion of unfair treatment, and the relationship breaks down, there is a natural inclination ask about rights of redress.

There are two avenues of complaint open to firms who think they have been unfairly treated. All suppliers have an in-house complaints process. But having exhausted that route, the next step is to try the Energy Ombudsman to have a complaint taken further. The ombudsman can only help microbusinesses (defined as having an annual consumption of electricity of not more than 100,000 kWh, or gas consumption of not more than 293,000 kWh; or fewer than 10 employees (or their full-time equivalent), and an annual turnover or annual balance sheet total not exceeding €2 million. Ofgem doesn’t get involved with individual complaints but it does have plenty of information on its website that may prove useful.

It is worth noting that help with seeking redress is a service that most consultants and brokers provide to customers. They take up queries with suppliers and use their contacts and knowledge to obtain a swift solution.

Sources of advice:  

www.ofgem.gov.uk

www.ombudsman-services.org/energy.html

www.carbontrust.com 


 

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