Alec Morgan (pictured third left)

Obituary - Alec Morgan

Published:  23 March, 2018

Colleagues, friends and associates are paying tribute to the life and career of one of the UK aftermarket’s most colourful characters, Alec Morgan, following his untimely death recently.  

In a career spanning four decades, Alec will be best remembered for the invaluable and outstanding contribution he made to the industry, and for the enthusiasm he showed across the senior positions he occupied, most recently as Key Account Manager at Banner Batteries (GB) Limited.  

Alec initially became involved with batteries when he worked as Sales Director at his father’s business – Alan A.Morgan Ltd - that distributed brands such as LUK, Banner and SWF. Following the sale of the business in 1995, and having worked for the new operation for the first six months, Alec set up his own business as an agent.  

He continued to develop in this role until April 1997 when Alec was recruited to head-up Banner Batteries in the UK following the Austrian manufacturer’s decision to set up its own IAM operation. It was a position that he occupied until 2013, when he took the decision to take a step back and assume the role of Key Account Manager.  

During his 17-year stewardship at Banner, Alec was successful in building a business that today stands as one of the most significant within the IAM sector. Alec was very passionate about the automotive industry and played an active role serving on the IAAF Council, the SMMT Aftermarket Council and was also on the Executive Board of the SMMT.   

  Lee Quinney, Banner Batteries Country Manager states: “Alec was without doubt one the most genuine people I’ve ever met and certainly had the pleasure of working alongside. Our relationship over the last three years at Banner has not only been thoroughly enjoyable but deeply rewarding.  His business acumen, fun loving spirit and full-on positivity were matched by a sense of humour that proved to be a winning cocktail.”  

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