VLS grows as Comline and Motaquip join

Published:  13 July, 2018

VLS (the Verification of Lubricant Specifications), the trade body which provides a means to verify lubricant specifications,  has welcomed Comline Auto Parts Ltd and Motaquip as its newest members. 

Miten Parikh, General Manager – Product & Supply Chain at Comline said: “Becoming an associate member of VLS adds further credibility to our brand in the lubricants segment but this is far more than a marketing ploy - we firmly believe in the VLS ethos of bringing transparency to the UK lubricant marketplace and look forward to working with them in support of this mission.”

Peter Cox, General Manager at Motaquip commented: “I firmly believe there is an obvious synergy between Motaquip and the VLS – the shared focus on quality! Motaquip’s tie-in with the VLS, an organisation whose modus operandi is to ensure quality and clarity within the lubricant sector, is a perfect alignment for our brand and we are delighted to have become an associate member.”

David Wright, Secretary of VLS and Director General of UKLA added: “Suppliers such as Comline and Motaquip are a vital part of the aftermarket supply chain and we are looking forward to working with them. In our fifth anniversary year, we now have nearly 30 members from across the lubricants industry and have investigated 58 cases since 2014.”

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