Exploiting Aircon

Air-conditioning offers an opportunity but are you making the most of it?

By Neil Pattermore |

Published:  07 September, 2018

Although it may be hard to believe given the weather so far this year, but a lot of customers will soon be starting to use their aircon systems only to quickly realise that their system is not working as expected, leaving them hot under the collar! So an ‘exploitable opportunity’ exists as the people in suits might say, but will you be in a position to exploit it most profitably?

Modern systems
With the majority of new cars now having some form of HVAC (heating, ventilation and airconditioning system) fitted as standard, it is no longer considered a luxury, just another part of the vehicle’s array of functions that should work when needed – summer or winter.
    
Many modern systems are designed to be highly efficient and rely on much less refrigerant than previously. Unfortunately, most customers do not understand that the system will naturally leak the refrigerant at a rate of between 10% and 20% per year (depending how often the system is used to circulate oil around the various pipes and seals) and it therefore requires regular servicing and maintenance to ensure continued efficiency. Ultimately, if the refrigerant level gets too low, the system will not operate at all.

Added value
The easy way to deal with this is to offer an ‘added value’ service whenever the vehicle is in your workshop – namely a free air-con system efficiency check. If the system does not perform to expectations, or emits a bad odour, then the opportunity exists to sell the service to your customer. So, make sure that you optimise the opportunity that aircon maintenance and servicing presents ensuring that your customers can keep their cool when summer finally arrives.
    
The fully automatic units available from the leading suppliers will allow full functionality with a minimum of technician’s time – who can still be servicing other aspects of the vehicle while the unit does the work. A printout at the end details what was done and if any problems exist – useful for both the customer and as an activity record for the F-Gas regulations.
    
If a problem exists with the vehicle air-con system then there is a requirement to diagnose and repair. A good understanding of the principle of operation and system design is necessary to both identify and repair profitably, in terms of time and for fitting the correct parts. The typical mathematics for the return on investment (ROI) are something like (prices as of May 2013 for illustration purposes only):

Cost of equipment                     £2,795
Cost of training                         £350
Marketing materials                   £250

        Total costs:                       £3,345

Air-con service                          £65 (net workshop revenue)
2 x air-con services per week     £130 net income

ROI    3345 ÷ 130 = 26 weeks.


This excludes any additional repair/parts revenue and is based on only two vehicles per week. With this in mind I really think the decision to invest in the training and technology is a no-brainer.

Aftermarket archive: May 2013 Aftermarket  |  www.aftermarketonline.net

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