Dayco – Power transmission specialist

Published:  14 August, 2018

Highlighting Dayco’s High Tenacity and HK belts demonstrates how the company is developing technology to improve performance of individual components and subsequently the drive system as a whole. Despite growing numbers of vehicles being fitted with High Tenacity (HT) timing belts as OE, technicians may not be aware that all OE HT belts are manufactured by Dayco.

It is Dayco that developed the twin spiralled glass-fibre cord technology which is wound into the core of these belts. This gives the incredible tensional strength, and provides  the patented PTFE/cotton fabric coating on the teeth that reduces friction and pulley wear. It also gives the HT belt its instantly recognisable appearance.
    
Meanwhile, Dayco HK belts feature a new tooth lining fabric and weave that incorporates aramid fibres. These are now appearing in the aftermarket and are included in specific timing belt and water pump kit applications, with the HK suffix in their marking.
    
The combination of guaranteed OE quality products, relevant technical expertise and product support, such as the Long Life +1 year warranty, makes Dayco the first choice for discerning professionals.

www.dayco.com

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