NGK – Mark Hallam on track!

Published:  14 September, 2018

NGK is a big supporter of Speedway racing and now one of its managers has been testing his own skills on the track.

Marketing Manager Mark Hallam took part in the 'Honda Ride & Skid it' Speedway experience at Buxton Speedway Circuit when he had the opportunity of riding a bike once owned by four-time World champion Greg Hancock who is sponsored by the company.

NGK Spark Plugs (UK) Ltd is a long-standing supporter of the sport where riders compete on 500cc bikes with no brakes.

Mark, who received tuition on a wet and windy day from former top Speedway riders, said: “Having very little motorcycle experience my main objective was to enjoy the day and not to come off the bike! Whilst I rode slowly, especially around the bends, I still got a feeling for the sport and now fully appreciate how skilled and brave professional Speedway riders are.

“As well as practising on 125cc Speedway bikes throughout the day I also got the chance to ride the NGK owned 500cc Grand Prix Speedway bike which was formerly owned by Greg Hancock. Whether you are a biker or not I challenge you to have a go at Speedway! Thanks to the team at 'ride and skid it' and also to my colleague and NGK Speedway guru John Money for organising the day.”

John Money said: “It was a tremendous effort by Mark as the weather was horrendous and he has little motorcycling experience. I would give him 10 out of 10. It is not until you put your leg over the bike and realise all that the riders have to think about that you really appreciate the skills the professionals have. It really puts it into perspective.

“It is testament to the ability of Les and Aidan Collins who coached Mark through the day that after training on a 125cc bike he felt confident enough to get on board a Grand Prix 500cc machine.

“The ‘ride and skid it’ is the ideal place for people of all abilities to try out the sport and have a fun day out under the supervision of top instructors.”

You can check out the ‘ride and skid it’ experience at www.rideandskidit.com

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