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Eden Tyres and Servicing saw a positive impact on growth after joining Castrol Service Network

Published:  12 November, 2018

Eden Tyres & Servicing is an independent family business. Having opened its first branch in Derby in 1981, Eden Tyres now operates 15 branches across the Midlands.   
    
As one of the first independent workshops to sign up to Castrol Service, all Eden Tyres sites are now part of the network of independent garages in the UK. Here, we look at how the business has benefitted from the technical and business support offered through The Race Group as a member of the Castrol Service Network.

Introducing Castrol Service
Developed by Castrol Oil, Castrol Service aims to create a nationwide network for the UK’s best independent garages. To be eligible to join the scheme, prospective garages must meet set criteria to ensure consistent standards across all centres. There is no associated cost for being part of the network but there is a requirement for the garage to commit to using Castrol Lubricants for 95% of its service work.
    
Once garages have been accepted into the network they benefit from significant investment from Castrol and The Race Group. There are three levels of co-branding available – basic, bespoke and complete dual branding – to help the garage build its reputation for offering a high-quality, professional service and help them stand out from the competition.

Commitment to quality
Jim Nicholls, Retail Operations Manager of Eden Tyres & Servicing explained: “In such a competitive market, and with so much new technology and changes within the automotive industry itself, you really need to be on top of your game in terms of technical knowledge and service. Having built up a reputation across the Midlands for embracing innovation and the latest automotive technology, it’s important to us that we maintain those high standards. We’ve been a customer of The Race Group for many years and when they told us about the Castrol Service network we knew it would be a winner for us.

“Our association with the Castrol name allows us to naturally attract customers that understand and appreciate the importance of using high quality products. Having the Castrol signage within our workshops really helps when we’re opening new sites in areas where we might not have much brand recognition ourselves.”

As a Castrol Service site, the team of technicians across all Eden Tyres & Servicing sites are able to take advantage of an extensive online training service. Access to this resource allows them to understand the ins and outs of all the products that they are being offered, their benefits and how to deal with potential objections from customers opting for more premium products.

Trusted
With Castrol branded signage, POS displays and workshop clothing staff uniforms, Castrol Service sites are able to capitalise on Castrol’s strong brand awareness amongst consumers to build a trusting relationship with their customers. According to Castrol Service, the endorsement of such a well-known brand means member garages can more effectively communicate the benefits of choosing them to look after their customers’ vehicles.

The Castrol Service Plus network in the UK is driven by The Race Group, a strategic lubricants partner for Castrol. To find out more about The Race Group, part of Certas Energy, visit www.theracegroup.co.uk




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