Ben appoints Steve Nash as Chair of its Board of Trustees

Published:  08 November, 2018

Ben has announced the appointment of Steve Nash as Chair of its Board of Trustees.

Steve has served on Ben’s Board since September 2014 and takes over as Chair from Robin Woolcock who has held the position for four years. Robin, who was formerly Managing Director of Volkswagen Group (UK) Ltd, has been a long-standing Board member for Ben.

Steve has worked in the motor industry, in both the retail and manufacturing sectors, since graduating in 1977. Steve joined BMW in 1986 and was a Director of the company from 1997, including a period as Group Aftersales Director, looking after the Rover and Land Rover brands.

Steve was Chair of the IMI for five years, before becoming President in November 2009. In 2012 he joined the IMI as Chief Executive Officer. Steve will work closely with Zara Ross, Chief Executive, to lead the organisation and head up its Board of Trustees.

Steve said: “I’m passionate about playing my part in Ben’s future by helping develop and indeed continue the charity’s success in supporting the people who work, or have worked, in the automotive industry with their health and wellbeing. Thank you to Robin for his dedication to Ben over the past four years, I look forward to carrying on the good work.”

Zara Ross, Chief Executive at Ben, said: “Steve is renowned for his strategic leadership, experience and depth of knowledge of the automotive industry, which will be invaluable as the sector embarks on a period of significant change. Steve will play a significant role in helping Ben progress to the next level of its transformation.”

Ben also welcomes new members to its Board of Trustees:  Sharon Ashcroft – HR Director, TrustFord; Chris Thomas – Finance Director, Retail Motor Industry Federation; Mark Outhwaite BSc, MBA, Chartered MCIPD, MBCS – Director, Outhentics Consulting; and Sarah Bayliss – Head of HR, Thatcham Research.

Zara Ross added: “With strong leadership in place, we believe Ben is in an excellent position to meet its ambitious strategic goals and continue to fulfil its purpose of providing support for life to the people of the automotive industry.”

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