Sukhpal leaves ECP and LKQ

Published:  02 January, 2019

Sukhpal Singh Ahluwalia has resigned from his positions as a Director of LKQ Corporation and as Executive Chairman of Euro Car Parts in the United Kingdom, it has been confirmed today (Wednesday 2 January 2019).

Sukhpal founded ECP company forty years ago. He sold the company to LKQ in 2011 and stayed on as CEO until 2014 when he became Executive Chairman.

Dominick Zarcone, President and Chief Executive Officer of LKQ Corporation, said: “Sukhpal has been a key partner with LKQ over the past seven years as we have quadrupled the size of our business in the U.K., and he has served as a valued LKQ board member. While we will miss his insights, we respect his desire to spend all his time focused on the family property business and wish him nothing but the best in those endeavours.”

Sukhpal commented: “ECP has been my life’s work and there will always be a bit of the company in me. I have enjoyed my relationship with LKQ but the time has come for a change so I can devote my full abilities to building the property business with my sons. I am confident in the strategy LKQ has for its European segment and for the next level of growth and operational excellence at ECP.”

Joseph M. Holsten, Chairman of the Board of LKQ added: “All of us at LKQ thank Sukhpal for everything he has done to build ECP over the years and extend our best wishes for much continued success.”

Sukhpal’s exit follows the announcement that Andy Hamilton has replaced Martin Gray as CEO of the ECP Group earlier today, with Martin opting to pursue other interests.

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    Please visit www.thegarageinspector.com for business training courses and for more business tips.

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