The Parts Alliance urges garages to give ‘Original Experience’

Published:  31 January, 2019

The Parts Alliance is running a new national garage promotion  through February and March. The ‘Original Experience’ will see The Parts Alliance collaborate with suppliers  Delphi, Comma, MANN-FILTER and NGK.

During the promotion period an ‘Original Experience’ scratch card will be given to garages with all purchases of qualifying products. These include Delphi brake pads, MANN-FILTER cabin and oil filters for the same vehicle, Comma 5 litre Performance Motor Oil as well as sets of NGK spark plugs.

As top prizes, the instant win scratch cards offer four unique motoring experiences.  Winning garages will gain luxury VIP trips, going respectively to the Rally Italia Sardegna, the Ferrari factory in Maranello and the GT Series in Germany. Closer to home, there’s the chance to drive six cars flat out around Bedford Autodrome during a renowned PalmerSport day.

Simon Moore, Head of Marketing at The Parts Alliance said: “Scratch card promotions are always incredibly popular and this one is our biggest yet as we’ve joined forces with four of our key suppliers. The beauty of this promotion is garages only need to source what they’ll be buying anyway for day to day braking and service work to win.”.

In total, there are 65,000 prizes including snack boxes, t-shirts, beanie hats, wall clocks, mugs, workwear socks, playing cards and bottle openers to be won before the end of March.

The ‘Original Experience’ is running nationwide at branches of Allparts, Bromsgrove Motor Factors, BBC Superfactors, BMS Superfactors, Car Parts & Accessories, CES, Dingbro, GMF Motor Factors, GSF Car Parts, SAS Autoparts, SC Motor Factors, The Parts Alliance (South West) and Waterloo Motor Trade.

Garages can find out more simply by contacting their nearest participating branch, or by visiting www.theOE.co.uk.      

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