Pineapple Curtains

Published:  01 April, 2019

Pineapple Curtains are British manufacturers and suppliers of made to measure industrial workshop curtains. The company makes workshop door curtains, workshop divider curtains, MOT bay curtains, service bay curtains, bodyshop door curtains, curtains for spray booths, auto body repair curtains, smart repair booths and much more.  They use clear and coloured fire retardant PVC to match any corporate style or branding.  Sewing is double stitched with rot proof thread for strength.  Pineapple Curtains also offer a full colour digital print service for customised curtains.
www.pineapplecurtains.co.uk

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