WIN with DAYCO

Published:  28 May, 2019

Dayco has some fantastic beanie hats and work gloves available for five lucky readers of Aftermarket, but they want to make sure the recipients are checking the condition of the auxiliary belt every time a vehicle enters the premises.

Wear to a typical EPDM formulated belt is very gradual, which makes it difficult to detect, so technicians should use the vehicle’s mileage as their first point of reference. If the vehicle has covered 60,000 miles or more, the belt should be thoroughly inspected and if it shows any sign of damage or wear, should automatically be replaced.

To help technicians correctly assess the condition of the belt, Dayco has designed the aWEARness gauge, which provides them with three ways to check whether the belt needs to be replaced or is okay to be reinstalled. The two most relevant to an EPDM belt are the wear indicator bar, which highlights material loss and the profile indicator, revealing whether the belt retains its correct form. Both reflect the level of wear and if the belt fails either check, it must be replaced.

To win, answer the following question: When should the condition of the auxiliary belt be assessed?

a) Every year

b) Every 60,000 miles

c) Every time the vehicle enters the workshop

Winner will be chosen at random from the correct answers when the competition closes on 26 June, and the winner will be notified by 28 June. The editor’s decision is final. No cash alternative offered.

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